Additional Resources - Teacher Development

Do you want to learn more about the Teacher Development strategies? Here you will find print, video, and online resources on:

Curtis, M. E., & Longo, A. M. (2001). Teaching vocabulary to adolescents to improve comprehension. Reading Online. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.readingonline.org/articles/art_index.asp?HREF=curtis/index.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article details an effort—Reading Is FAME—to teach content vocabulary to middle and high school students who need help to reach grade level in reading.
Highlights The article describes several ways to build content vocabulary. The authors provide links to more information on each strategy. And, they cite the assessment tools they use in Reading Is FAME.
Harmon, J. M., Wood, K. D., & Hendrick, W. B. (2006). Instructional strategies for teaching content vocabulary, grades 4 –12. Newark, Delaware: International Reading Association.
Type of Resource Book
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This book offers more than 40 strategies that teachers in all content areas can use to help their students build new vocabulary and subject-area concepts.
Highlights The book describes each strategy in detail. The authors include variations for each strategy. And, they provide content-area examples and blackline masters.
Henry, L. (2002–2009). ABC bookmaking builds vocabulary in the content areas. ReadWriteThink. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=276
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This detailed lesson plan guides teachers to build students’ content vocabulary by helping them create ABC Books.
Highlights The lesson plan is designed for middle school teachers to use in any content area. It has step-by-step instructions for students to create ABC books on any topic. In doing so, students engage with new concepts in a variety of ways. They also research the meaning of new terms. The author includes several links to handouts that teachers can use in the lesson. (Note: The National Council of Teachers of English—NCTE provided support for this resource. And, the lesson plan aligns with NCTE standards.)
University of Oregon. (Producer). (2009). Shaping the way we teach English. Module 01, contextualizing language. Retrieved [2009], from http://oelp.uoregon.edu/shaping.html
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This training video is part of a series on how to best teach K–12 English language learners.
Highlights The video shows how teachers can help students build their content vocabulary by offering context for learning new words. The strategies include games, hands-on activities, storytelling, drama, and finding themes in activities. In this video, students learn new words through songs, play-acting, and creating a video presentation.
WGBH Boston (Producer). (1996). Teaching math: A video library, 9–12. Properties of parallelograms. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/resources/series34.html?pop=yes&pid=928
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video shows high school teachers how to teach math to align with standards from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM).
Highlights The video is part of a 20-program online library. In this video, students explore parallelograms. Working in small groups, they respond to the teacher’s open-ended questions, which help deepen their understanding of key terms. They also use tangrams (seven paper geometric shapes) to make parallelograms and test their knowledge of math concepts. Other features include comments from the teacher and analysis questions for viewers.
Annenberg Media. (1997–2011). Interactives. Math in daily life: How do numbers affect everyday decisions? Retrieved [2009], from http://www.learner.org/interactives/dailymath/index.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Math
Overview This online resource for high school students and teachers takes a look at six ways that math impacts daily life.
Highlights The resource has lively, close-up views of math in the “real world”—from cooking to casinos. It clearly explains the math ideas behind each example. For each topic, users can dig deeper into the content and engage in practical activities.
Ellis, K. (Producer) (2001). Project learning: An overview. Retrieved [2009], from Edutopia, The George Lucas Educational Foundation (Distributor), http://www.edutopia.org/project-based-learning-overview
Type of Resource Video, online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This video spotlights project based learning (PBL) in which students gain skills and build their knowledge by tackling real-world problems.
Highlights The video shows PBL in action in K–12 classrooms. The featured students create electric cars. They dive into the ocean to explore eco-systems. And they find out how to put out a fire in outer space. The video also offers comments from scholars on the vital role of PBL in instruction. In addition to this video, the Edutopia website offers a number of other video and written resources on PBL.
Edmondson, B., Fries-Gaither, J., Lightle, K., & LeFever, M. (2007–2009). Connecting news with National Science Education Standards. Expert Voices Gateway of the National Science Digital Library’s Middle School Portal. Retrieved [2009], from http://expertvoices.nsdl.org/connectingnews/
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Science
Overview This blog, funded by the National Science Foundation, connects recent news stories to science concepts in the National Science Education Standards.
Highlights The blog has a weekly feature in which a scientist explains the science behind a popular news story. Scientists link the stories to classrooms by highlighting relevant NSES standards. They also suggest how to create inquiry-based science lessons drawn from the stories.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Producer). (1995). The science of teaching science. Workshop 3: Creating a context for learning. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1003
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video shows teachers and researchers discussing how establishing context helps students learn science content.
Highlights The video is one of eight that share ways to enhance K–8 science teaching. Without proper context, students can’t grasp what their teachers want them to learn. Featuring classroom footage, the video shows ways to “frame” science lessons to make them accessible to students.
Thirteen Ed Online. (Producer). (2003). Concept to classroom workshop: Constructivism as a paradigm for teaching and learning. Retrieved [2009], from Educational Broadcasting Corporation (Distributor), http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/constructivism/index.html
Type of Resource Online resource, includes videos
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This self-paced, online professional development workshop introduces users to the principles of constructivism, which relies on framing lessons as challenging problems based on students’ interests.
Highlights The workshop features videos, lesson plans, and discussion questions that help teachers use the strategy in their classrooms. The workshop also has research summaries of the pros and cons of this strategy. Teachers with all levels of experience with the strategy will find these materials to be useful.
WGBH Boston (Producer). (1997). Teaching math: A video library, K–4. Connections. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=995
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video discusses the importance of connecting math to the lives of students.
Highlights The video shows how teachers can make math concepts real for students. Classroom footage illustrates how students get excited about math when it is connected to their lives.
Annenberg Media. (1997–2011). Interactives. Math in daily life: How do numbers affect everyday decisions? Retrieved [2009], from http://www.learner.org/interactives/dailymath/index.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Math
Overview This online resource for high school students and teachers takes a look at six ways that math impacts daily life.
Highlights The resource has lively, close-up views of math in the “real world”—from cooking to casinos. It clearly explains the math ideas behind each example. For each topic, users can dig deeper into the content and engage in practical activities.
Edmondson, B., Fries-Gaither, J., Lightle, K., & LeFever, M. (2007–2009). Connecting news with National Science Education Standards. Expert Voices Gateway of the National Science Digital Library’s Middle School Portal. Retrieved [2009], from http://expertvoices.nsdl.org/connectingnews/
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Science
Overview This blog, funded by the National Science Foundation, connects recent news stories to science concepts in the National Science Education Standards.
Highlights The blog has a weekly feature in which a scientist explains the science behind a popular news story. Scientists link the stories to classrooms by highlighting relevant NSES standards. They also suggest how to create inquiry-based science lessons drawn from the stories.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Producer). (1995). The science of teaching science. Workshop 3: Creating a context for learning. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1003
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video shows teachers and researchers discussing how establishing context helps students learn science content.
Highlights The video is one of eight that share ways to enhance K–8 science teaching. Without proper context, students can’t grasp what their teachers want them to learn. Featuring classroom footage, the video shows ways to “frame” science lessons to make them accessible to students.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (Producers). (1995). The science of teaching science. Workshop 2—Eliciting students’ prior knowledge. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/resources/series90.html?pop=yes&pid=1002
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video explores why it is vital to find out what students believe before they start a new science investigation.
Highlights The video is one of eight that share ways to enhance K–8 science teaching. It suggests many ways to identify students’ prior knowledge. It also features a useful discussion by a group of teachers and researchers on how preconceived notions affect learning.
Maryland Public Television (Producer). (2003). Making meaning in literature: A video library, grades 6–8. Program 6: Dramatic tableaux. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1824
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video shows how the “tableaux” technique can help students more deeply understand the novels they read.
Highlights The video spotlights tableaux. In this strategy, students act out scenes and view scenes as an audience. In doing so, they actively engage with the content of a novel. The teacher in the video provides several tips to help structure tableaux lessons.
DiSpezio, M. (1995). Scientific American Frontiers teaching guide. Dead man’s tales. Activity 2: Grades 5–8. Inferring height from bone length. Retrieved [2009], from PBS (Distributor), http://www.pbs.org/saf/1203/teaching/teachPDF2.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Science
Overview This lesson plan engages students in gauging height from the length of an individual’s femur, humerus, and tibia bones.
Highlights The lesson plan complements the “Dead Man’s Tales” video, but teachers can use it on its own. Students engage in a lively activity in which they infer each others’ heights from measured bone length. It includes rigorous extension activities and links to related websites.
Harrell, Z. (2004). Mathematics GEE 21 focused learning lessons : Data analysis, probability & discrete math. Lesson 8: Making inferences. Retrieved [2009], from the Louisiana Department of Education (Publisher), http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/uploads/5654.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Math
Overview This lesson plan focuses on how to make inferences from graphs.
Highlights The lesson plan offers teachers a clear approach to teaching inferences. It provides blackline masters of graphs with questions for students and an answer key.
Harvard-Smithsonian for Astrophysics and Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (Producers). (1999). Looking at learning again, part 1. Workshop 3: Conceptual thinking. Retrieved.[2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1260
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video explores the instructional strategy of concept maps to build student knowledge.
Highlights The video shows how concept maps help students absorb ideas. By tapping students’ prior knowledge, these maps build their understanding of new terms or concepts. Noted scholar Dr. Robert Novak comments on the use of the maps in cognitive development and science education.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Producer). (1995). The science of teaching science. Workshop 3: Creating a context for learning. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1003
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video shows teachers and researchers discussing how establishing context helps students learn science content.
Highlights The video is one of eight that share ways to enhance K–8 science teaching. Without proper context, students can’t grasp what their teachers want them to learn. Featuring classroom footage, the video shows ways to “frame” science lessons to make them accessible to students.
Kispal, A. (2008). Effective teaching of inference skills for reading. Literature review. Retrieved [2009], from the Department for Children, Schools and Families (Publisher), http://www.education.gov.uk/publications/eOrderingDownload/DCSF-RR031.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area English language arts
Overview This literature review presents research on the inference skills students must have to read.
Highlights The review explores types of inference. It connects poor inference skills with poor reading comprehension. And, it outlines the best ways to teach students inference skills.
Kopitski, M. (2007). Exploring the teaching of inference skills. Retrieved [2009], from Hamline University, http://www.hamline.edu/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=2147490904
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This paper reviews the findings of a study on teaching inference to students.
Highlights The paper presents the study’s methods and results. It describes ways to teach inference and details the effectiveness of each approach. It also includes student work samples and handouts.
WGBH Foundation (Producer). (2005). Teaching reading 3–5 workshop. Classroom program 9: Investigating word meaning. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=2193
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video shows how students use context clues in E.B. White’s “Charlotte’s Web” to learn new vocabulary words.
Highlights The video is one of 16 that focus on how to help students “read to learn.” It spotlights how one teacher builds her students’ vocabulary. It also features book groups and small group work.
Lockhart, A., & Le Doux, J. (2005, December). A partnership for problem-based learning: Challenging students to consider open ended problems involving gene therapy. The Science Teacher, 72(9), 29–33. Retrieved [2009], from http://science.nsta.org/enewsletter/2006-11/tst0512_29.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Science/Interdisciplinary
Overview This article describes how to use project-based learning (PBL) to teach a gene therapy unit in high school biology
Highlights The article explains how PBL can engage students in learning challenging content in all grade levels and content areas. The authors state that PBL helps students take ownership of their learning. PBL also helps students develop advanced ways to solve problems. The article includes a lesson plan and teaching tips. (Note: A high school biology teacher and a research biologist co-created the unit plan and co-wrote this article.)
Thirteen Ed Online (Producer). (2003). Concept to classroom workshop: Constructivism as a paradigm for teaching and learning. Retrieved [2009], from Educational Broadcasting Corporation (Distributor), http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/constructivism/index.html
Type of Resource Online resource, includes videos
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This self-paced, online professional development workshop introduces users to the principles of constructivism, which relies on framing lessons as challenging problems based on students’ interests.
Highlights The workshop features videos, lesson plans, and discussion questions to help teachers plan how they will use the strategy in their classrooms. The workshop also has research summaries of the pros and cons of this strategy. Teachers with all levels of experience with the strategy will find these materials to be useful.
Warner, D. (2007). Proving the pythagorean theorem. Retrieved [2009], from http://math.buffalostate.edu/~it/Movies/Warner.html
Type of Resource Video, online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This video shows students engaged in a lesson to prove the Pythagorean Theorem.
Highlights The video highlights students working with little direct instruction to solve a challenging problem. In the video, the teacher begins the lesson, students work on the problem in small groups, and the teacher interacts with students. A written summary of the lesson plan accompanies the video. Users can also access a more detailed version of the plan through hyperlinks.
Washor, E., & Mojkowski, C. (2006). What do you mean by rigor? Educational Leadership, 64(4), 84–87. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.bigpicture.org/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/070101-educational-leadership.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article examines rigor and argues that we need to define the concept in a new way.
Highlights The article offers an expanded definition of rigor. The authors note that rigor must go beyond factual content and advanced courses. They argue that rigor should reflect a deep immersion in a curriculum, where students have the opportunity to engage with content in several different ways.
WGBH Educational Foundation (Producer). (2003). Learning math: Geometry: Video 6. Pythagorean Theorem. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1804
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video shares an interactive way to teach the Pythagorean Theorem.
Highlights The video is one of 12 that build K–8 teachers’ knowledge of how to best teach geometry. In interviews, an expert describes how teaching students to memorize the theorem differs from asking them to prove it. And, teachers talk about proving the theorem, share their work with peers, and reflect on how their own understanding of the theorem deepens.
Bell, V. S. Author’s purpose. Retrieved [2009], from http://edujourney.net/Powerpoint.htm
Type of Resource PowerPoint presentation
Content Area English language arts
Overview This presentation describes three reasons why authors write and gives examples of each.
Highlights The presentation covers writing to persuade, inform, and entertain. Each slide’s writing sample invites viewers to identify the author’s purpose. Teachers could use these examples with students.
Kentucky Educational Television (Producer). (2004). Write in the middle: A workshop for middle school teachers. Workshop 4. Teaching persuasive writing. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=2075
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video shows two teachers leading lessons that give students a chance to write about topics that matter to them.
Highlights The video is one of eight workshops. All eight focus on writing instruction in middle school. This workshop covers topics such as: brainstorming, knowledge of your audience, and writer’s motivation. In the video, students organize and prepare persuasive essays. The video also contains examples of teaching and comments from the featured teachers.
Maiers Educational Services, Inc. (2009). Mini-lesson: Text structure and powerful writing. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.angelamaiers.com/2009/02/mini-lesson-text-structure-and-writing.html
Type of Resource Video, online resource
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video suggests ways to teach students how to write for different purposes.
Highlights The video is part of an education consultant’s blog. In the video, she models a mini-lesson in which she shares the structures of non-fiction writing and asks students to choose one to match their purpose. The blog has links to additional resources on writing for different purposes.
National Writing Project. (n.d.) Resource topics. Teaching writing—audience. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/resource_topic/audience
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This website provides links to many projects that focus on writing for an audience.
Highlights The website has a wealth of written, audio, and video resources. One project, Letters to the Next President, teaches author’s purpose by asking students to write letter to the president. In another project, students create digital stories of their families’ immigration experiences.
Tower, C. (2005, July). What’s the purpose? Students talk about writing in science. Language Arts, 82(6), 472–483. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.learner.org/workshops/writing35/pdf/s8_whats_the_purpose.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Science
Overview This article explores the role that genre writing in science education plays in honing students’ writing skills.
Highlights The article asserts that it is vital for science teachers to give students a wide range of texts written for different audiences and purposes. The author asked fourth grade students to share their ideas about why—and for whom—they write in science class. Their comments suggest that they structure their writing based on cues from teachers. In response to this finding, the author offers ways that teachers can weave writing for different purposes into the science curriculum. Examples include how to tailor inquiry lessons to students’ questions and interests.
Department of Staff Development, & Division of Instruction; Prince George’s County Public Schools. (n.d.). A guide to cooperative learning. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.pgcps.pg.k12.md.us/~elc/learning1.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This easy to read online article provides a succinct overview of cooperative learning.
Highlights The article’s hands-on tips help teachers use this strategy. The authors share management ideas. They cover key issues in forming teams. And, they discuss effective cooperative learning techniques. They also include a useful set of role cards that make it easy to organize small groups.
Ellis, K. (Producer). (2008). Cooperative arithmetic: How to teach math as a social activity. Retrieved [2009], from Edutopia, The George Lucas Educational Foundation (Distributor), http://www.edutopia.org/math-social-activity-sel-video
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video describes and demonstrates how an upper-elementary teacher creates a cooperative learning environment in his classroom.
Highlights The video is rich in classroom footage. It offers a close-up look at working agreements. It also spotlights a fishbowl activity in which students “walk the talk” of their agreements. Many resources go along with the video. Users can check out a working agreement. They can explore the fishbowl protocol. They can also view sample student self-evaluations.
Johnson, R., & Johnson, D. (1994). An overview of cooperative learning. In J. Thousand, R. Villa, & A. Nevin (Eds.), Creativity and collaborative learning: A practical guide to empowering students and teachers (pp. 31–43). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. Available for free online at: The Cooperative Learning Center of the University of Minnesota, http://teachers.henrico.k12.va.us/staffdev/mcdonald_j/downloads/21st/comm/BenefitsOfCL/OverviewOfCoopLrng_Benefits.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This book chapter, often cited by educators, presents Johnson and Johnson’s five elements of cooperative learning.
Highlights The chapter clearly explains each of the five elements. The authors also review the research on the benefits of the strategy. And, their website has a wealth of materials on cooperative learning. (See http://www.co-operation.org/.)
Saskatoon Public Schools. (2008). Instructional strategies online: Cooperative learning. Retrieved [2009], from http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/DE/PD/instr/strats/coop/index.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This resource offers a variety of materials related to cooperative learning including an online tutorial and lesson plans.
Highlights The resource’s content echoes that of a variety of resources on this strategy. Yet, it also includes assessment worksheets, which are more rare. And, teachers will find the featured lesson plans to be helpful and specific. They demonstrate how to use and assess the strategy in a variety of subject areas.
Teachers TV. (2007). Problem-solving in primary maths—the session. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/teachers-tv/problem-solving-primary-maths-session
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video shows four upper-elementary students working collaboratively on a problem involving measurement, geometry, and algebra.
Highlights The video focuses on the student-to-student interactions. This approach offers the viewer an amazing glimpse of the collaborative process. The video also profiles the facilitation role of the teacher in collaborative learning.
Thirteen Ed Online (Producer). (2004). Concept to classroom workshop: Cooperative and collaborative learning. Retrieved [2009], from Educational Broadcasting Corporation (Distributor), http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/coopcollab/index.html
Type of Resource Online resource, includes videos
Content Area Multiple
Overview This self-paced, online professional development workshop introduces users to the principles of cooperative learning.
Highlights The workshop features videos, lesson plans, and discussion questions. These resources help teachers plan how they will use this strategy. The workshop also has research summaries of the pros and potential cons of the strategy. And, it covers which types of small group protocols work best to achieve different learning objectives.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Producer), & Annenberg Institute for School Reform (Producer). (1999). Principles for principals: Workshop 3. Math/science skills—what's important? Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/resources/series110.html
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math and science
Overview This video shows how a class of fifth and sixth grade students worked with their small town to collect and analyze samples from 100 sources of water.
Highlights The video illustrates how students can use data analysis in the real world. After they collect the water samples, students learn how to collate their data. Then, they analyze the data to find patterns and share their findings with the community.
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (2000–2009). Illuminations: Resources for teaching math. Representing data. [Unit adapted from the article: Cook, M. (1989, April). Ideas: Applications. The Arithmetic Teacher, 36(8), 27–32.] Retrieved [2009], from http://illuminations.nctm.org/LessonDetail.aspx?ID=U73
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Math
Overview This online unit teaches students to collect, represent, and analyze data.
Highlights The unit’s two step-by-step lesson plans help students see ways they can use math in the real world. Each plan has learning objectives. And, each plan shows how it links to NCTM standards. The larger website (http://illuminations.nctm.org/) provides many links to resources related to data analysis (http://illuminations.nctm.org/WebResourceList.aspx?Ref=2&Std=4&Grd=0).
The Ohio State University. (2005) Data analysis: As real world as it gets. Retrieved [2009], from NSDL Middle School Portal, http://msteacher.org/epubs/math/math3/math.aspx
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Math
Overview These webpages offer a wealth of resources for middle school teachers on data and statistics.
Highlights The webpages’ links give teachers the background they need to teach these subjects well. They also connect teachers with many lessons and projects that focus on data analysis.
Thirteen/WNET New York (Producer), & Education Development Center, Inc. (Producer). (2000). Learning science through inquiry. Workshop 5: The inquiry continues: Collecting data and drawing upon resources. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1456
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video captures data collection and preliminary analysis by students as they engage in inquiry-based labs.
Highlights The video is one of eight workshops. All eight focus on science inquiry. In this video, students collect data and reflect on the meaning of what they’ve recorded. The footage shows how using the same processes that scientists use helps students see patterns and builds their understanding.
WGBH Educational Foundation (Producer). (2003). Learning math: Data analysis, statistics, and probability. Video 2: Data organization and representation. Retrieved. [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1687
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video shows many ways to represent, analyze, and interpret data.
Highlights The video is one of 11 that build K–8 teachers’ knowledge of math concepts. Teachers who plan to engage their students in data analysis and are seeking an overview of ways to represent data will find this video to be useful. It describes line plots, frequency tables, bar graphs, and many other methods.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Producer). (2003). Essential science for teachers: Life science. Session 2: Classifying living things. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/resources/series179.html
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video discusses how students can learn to classify living things.
Highlights The video is one of eight that build teachers’ knowledge of life science. In the video, two professors discuss how to help students classify things in the natural world. A scientist and teachers also weigh in. And, the video shows elementary level students working to classify living things.
North Central Regional Educational Laboratory. (1988). Graphic organizers. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/students/learning/lr2grap.htm
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This webpage offers nine graphic organizers that can help students put their ideas in a logical order.
Highlights The webpage has clear, easy-to-read graphics. Each organizer has a short explanation of when students should use it.
Oaks, S. (1995–1996). Essay writing workshop: Developing ideas for writing/prewriting (excerpted from College writing without teachers). In Empire State College, C. Copley, L. Greenberg, E. Handley, S. Oaks, & contributors, The writer’s complex. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.esc.edu/ESConline/Across_ESC/WritersComplex.nsf/ 3CC42A422514347A8525671D0049F395/CE2B510E7D9975AE852569C3006ACCCC?OpenDocument#brainstorming
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area English language arts
Overview This online resource highlights ways to help students generate and organize their ideas before they write essays.
Highlights The resource’s strategies—from mapping ideas to writing in a journal and beyond—get students ready to write. Clear examples make it easy to use each strategy.
Ontario Ministry of Education. (2003). Think literacy cross-curricular approaches, Grades 7–12. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/studentsuccess/thinkliteracy/files/Writing.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This 241-page guide includes an in-depth discussion of the writing process.
Highlights The guide is a rich resource. It explains how to help students brainstorm (pp. 118–120). And, it offers a useful way for students to organize their ideas (pp. 128–130). Both sections have clear lesson plans and worksheets.
Saskatoon Public Schools. (n.d.). Instructional strategies online: Categorizing. Retrieved [2009], from http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/DE/PD/instr/strats/categorizing/index.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This webpage defines and discusses this strategy.
Highlights The webpage has an easy-to-read overview of the topic. Its Teacher Resources give examples of how to use the strategy in multiple disciplines.
WGBH Boston (Producer). (1997). Teaching math: A video library, 5–8. Program 2: Hexominoes. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/resources/series33.html
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Mathematics
Overview This video shows fifth grade students making hexominoes and grouping them by their features.
Highlights The video shows how students think as they sort mathematical models. As students talk to each other, viewers gain insights into what they are learning.
Center for Inquiry-Based Learning. (2007). Resources for teachers: Inquiry exercises. Retrieved [2014], from http://ciblearning.org/teacher-resources/inquiry-exercises/
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Science and mathematics
Overview This webpage links users to instructional plans that promote inquiry-based learning.
Highlights The webpage’s plans have synopses, objectives, and materials lists. They describe procedures and suggest ways to engage students in talking about the topics that extend students’ learning. Some of the plans link users to related lessons.
Henry, D., Henry, J., & Riddoch, S. ( 2006, April). Whiteboarding your way to great student discussions. Science Scope, 29(7), 50–53. Available for free online at: http://physicsed.buffalostate.edu/pubs/Elem_whiteboarding.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article describes how students can use whiteboards to reflect on what they have learned and to share their thoughts with peers.
Highlights The article explores the ways that students benefit from using whiteboards. The authors discuss how to help students use them effectively. They also suggest how to share the information that students record on whiteboards.
National Research Council. Committee on Development of an Addendum to the National Science Education Standards on Scientific Inquiry, Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education. (2000). Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A guide for teaching and learning. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available for free online at: http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?isbn=0309064767
Type of Resource Book
Content Area Science
Overview This book is a practical guide for educators using inquiry in their classrooms.
Highlights The book provides in-depth information related to inquiry-based science. Chapters include: Preparing Teachers for Inquiry-Based Teaching, Making the Case for Inquiry, Frequently Asked Questions About Inquiry, and Selecting Instructional Materials.
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). (2004). NSTA position statement: Scientific inquiry. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.nsta.org/about/positions/inquiry.aspx
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Science
Overview This webpage presents the NSTA’s official position on scientific inquiry.
Highlights The webpage defines scientific inquiry. It builds a strong case for using the approach. And, it makes a series of recommendations for science teachers. These cover: (1) inquiry as a teaching approach; (2) students’ abilities to do inquiry; and (3) students’ understanding of inquiry.
Thirteen/WNET New York (Producer), & Education Development Center, Inc. (Producer). (2000). Learning science through inquiry. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/resources/series129.html
Type of Resource Video series
Content Area Science
Overview This video series features eight one-hour programs that show inquiry-based learning in action.
Highlights The series shows students using inquiry to learn more about science. All videos offer a close-up look at what it is like to work through the process of investigation. Each video has support materials and resources (http://www.learner.org/workshops/inquiry/).
WVIZ/PBS Ideastream. (2009). PSI: Physical science investigation. Exploring core concepts in physical science. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.wviz.org/psi
Type of Resource Online resource with video
Content Area Science
Overview This online resource links users to a series of physical science experiments.
Highlights The resource’s “video labs” have segments for teachers, as well as for students. The labs’ clear, step-by-step demos include guiding questions. They also explain physical science concepts. And, they suggest ways to help students continue to explore. Each video comes with a lesson plan and resources.
Alfonsi, C. (2008). Hey teacher! Get off that stage: Assessing student thinking with Socratic seminars. Ohio Journal of English Language Arts, 48(1), 65–71. Retrieved [2009], from http://memberfiles.freewebs.com/91/52/57585291/documents/SocraticSeminars.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area English language arts
Overview This article explores whether class discussions can be a method of learning rather than simply an opportunity for students to recite the right answer.
Highlights The article weighs the merits of the Socratic seminar as a method for involving students in rich discussion. The author covers key aspects of Socratic seminars: how to prepare students; the role of the teacher; working with students who don’t participate; and assessment.
Duschl, R. A., Schweingruber, H. A., & Shouse, A. W. (Eds.); Committee on Science Learning, Kindergarten through Eighth Grade. (2007). Participation in scientific practices and discourse. In Taking science to school: Learning and teaching science in grades K–8 (pp. 186–210). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Retrieved [2009], from http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11625&page=186
Type of Resource Book
Content Area Science
Overview This chapter examines research related to engaging middle grades students in scientific discussion.
Highlights The chapter discusses the qualities of scientific discussion and argument. Drawing from science education research, it describes how teachers can guide their students to engage in scientific discussions in which they provide evidence for their ideas and examine arguments critically.
Maryland Public Television (Producer). (2003). Making meaning in literature: A video library, grades 6–8. Program 4: Facilitating discussions. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1822
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video captures a sixth grade English language arts teacher facilitating a student discussion of “Among the Hidden,” a novel by Margaret Peterson Haddix.
Highlights The video shows strategies teachers can use to engage students in literature through class discussion. For example, the teacher’s open-ended questions encourage students to think deeply about tensions in the novel and share their ideas.
Piccolo, D. L., Harbaugh, A. P., Carter, T. A., Capraro, M. M., & Capraro, R. M. (2008). Quality of instruction: Examining discourse in middle school mathematics instruction. Journal of Advanced Academics, 19(3), 376–410. Available for free from your local library after signing in at: http://www.academia.edu/441976/Quality_of_Instruction_Examining_Discourse_In_Middle_School_Mathematics_Instruction (Go to bottom of summary and click on “View articles courtesy of your local library.”)
Type of Resource Article
Content Area Math
Overview This article presents the findings of a study that point to the qualities of discourse that lead to rich interactions in middle school math classrooms.
Highlights The article asserts that conversations teachers initiate tend to focus on communicating facts. These conversations are often one-sided discussions with little student involvement. The authors note that student-initiated questioning, in contrast, often leads to richer explanations by teachers that enhance student learning.
Thirteen/WNET New York (Producer), & Education Development Center, Inc. (Producer). (2000). Learning science through inquiry. Workshop 1: What is inquiry and why do it? Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1452
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video gives an overview of what scientific inquiry looks like in the classroom and explains why inquiry is a powerful strategy to advance student understanding in science.
Highlights The video is one of eight workshops. All eight focus on science inquiry. In this video, teachers and students engage in inquiry-based lessons. And, science educators explain how inquiry builds upon children’s natural curiosity. Teachers who are starting to design inquiry-based lessons will find this video to be very helpful. Those seeking to refine their practice in specific aspects of scientific inquiry will benefit from other videos in the series.
Deubel, P. (2001–2009). Math manipulatives. Retrieved [2009], from Computing Technology for Math Excellence, http://www.ct4me.net/math_manipulatives.htm
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Math
Overview This online resource includes an essay about math manipulatives and links to several additional resources.
Highlights The resource defines virtual manipulatives. The author takes a close look at the role, use, and overuse of these learning aids. She also describes, and links to, more than 100 resources.
Haury, D. L., & Rillero, P. (1994). Perspectives of hands-on science teaching. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/content/cntareas/science/eric/eric-1.htm
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This online resource features 10 questions that teachers often ask about hands-on teaching and learning.
Highlights The resource gives three answers for each question. The result is a clear, balanced view of the hands-on approach.
Michigan Reach Out!. Quick and easy activities: Middle school activities. (2003). Retrieved [2009], from http://www.reachoutmichigan.org/funexperiments/quick/middlesch.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Science
Overview This online resource features links to a variety of hands-on science activities.
Highlights The resource has an A-Z list of more than 200 hands-on activities. Each focuses on a specific scientific concept.
Rand, R. E. (2009). Visual fractions: A tutorial that models fractions with number lines or circles. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.visualfractions.com
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Math
Overview The website has a rich array of games and visuals to help students with fractions.
Highlights This website makes it fun for students to learn fractions. Students can add, subtract, compare, multiply, and divide fractions. They can also use the site’s “Investigate” feature to learn more about each topic.
Teachers TV. (2006). KS3/4 maths: Demonstrating dynamic geometry. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/teachers-tv/ks34-maths-demonstrating-dynamic-geometry
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video shows how software can help transform the way students learn geometry.
Highlights The video offers guidance in using software to engage students in exploring concepts. A teacher models using software to create graphs. Then students use the software to learn more about straight line graphs.
Thirteen/WNET (Producer). (2004). Insights into Algebra 1: Teaching for learning. Workshop 8: Mathematical modeling. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=2103
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video shows how two teachers use models to build their students’ knowledge of key algebra concepts.
Highlights The video is one of eight workshops. All eight show students involved in hands-on learning that helps them grasp key math concepts. In this video, teachers share how and why models help them meet their learning objectives for their Algebra 1 students.
Alfonsi, C. (2008). Hey teacher! Get off that stage: Assessing student thinking with Socratic seminars. Ohio Journal of English Language Arts, 48(1), 65–71. Retrieved [2009], from http://memberfiles.freewebs.com/91/52/57585291/documents/SocraticSeminars.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area English language arts
Overview This article explores whether class discussions can be a method of learning rather than simply an opportunity for students to recite the right answer.
Highlights The article weighs the merits of the Socratic Seminar as a method for involving students in rich discussion. The author covers key aspects of Socratic seminars—how to prepare students, the role of the teacher, and working with students who don’t participate—and discusses assessment.
Center for Inspired Teaching. (2008). Inspired issue brief: Inquiry-based teaching. Retrieved [2014], from http://www.inspiredteaching.org/wp-content/uploads/impact-research-briefs-inquiry-based-teaching.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This five-page brief presents findings from studies on inquiry-based teaching.
Highlights The brief is a good starting point for teachers who want to explore this strategy. It defines the strategy and cites research that shows why the strategy is important. It also provides a helpful list of resources on the topic.
Maryland Public Television (Producer). (2003). Making meaning in literature: A video library, grades 6–8. Program 4: Facilitating discussions. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1822
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video captures a sixth grade English language arts teacher facilitating a student discussion of Among the Hidden, a novel by Margaret Peterson Haddix.
Highlights The video shows strategies teachers can use to engage students in literature through class discussion. For example, the teacher’s open-ended questions encourage students to think deeply about tensions in the novel and share their ideas.
Maryland Public Television (Producer). (2003). Making meaning in literature: A video library, grades 6–8. Program 5: Seminar discussion. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1823
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video presents a seventh grade English Language Arts teacher questioning her students on their thoughts related to Langston Hughes’ short story, Passing.
Highlights The video spotlights the key role that questions have in the inquiry process. The teacher’s thoughtful questions help her engage most of her students in a rich discussion. In the video, she shares how she uses questions to check students’ understanding and get them to think deeply about the issues the characters face. She also explains why she chose a seminar approach.
Thirteen/WNET New York (Producer), & Education Development Center, Inc. (Producer). (2000). Learning science through inquiry. Workshop 1: What is inquiry and why do it? Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1452
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview The video is one of eight workshops. All eight focus on science inquiry. In this video, teachers and students engage in inquiry-based lessons. And, science educators explain how inquiry builds upon children’s natural curiosity. Teachers who are starting to design inquiry-based lessons will find this video to be very helpful. Those seeking to refine their practice in specific aspects of scientific inquiry will benefit from other videos in the series.
Highlights This video gives an overview of what scientific inquiry looks like in the classroom and explains why inquiry is a powerful strategy to advance student understanding in science.
The YouthLearn Initiative at Education Development Center, Inc. (2003). How to develop an inquiry-based project. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.youthlearn.org/learning/planning/lesson-planning/how-inquiry/how-inquiry
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This online resource offers teachers a step by step guide to designing inquiry-based projects.
Highlights The resource outlines the four main parts of the inquiry process. It helps teachers plan and begin an inquiry-based project that links to their learning goals for students. It also offers tips to help them avoid common pitfalls. And, it provides links to forms that teachers can use to engage students in the inquiry process.
Elam, K. G., & Duckenfield, M. (Eds.). (2000). Creating a community of learners: Using the teacher as facilitator model. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED447079.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This handbook describes how this model can help teachers promote students’ learning.
Highlights The handbook presents inspiring, real-life stories of teachers who use this model. It describes how they evolved their teaching methods. It talks about how the model affects the learning environments of their classes. And, it discusses how their students have benefited.
Ellis, K. (Producer). (2008). Cooperative arithmetic: How to teach math as a social activity. Retrieved [2009], from Edutopia, The George Lucas Educational Foundation (Distributor), http://www.edutopia.org/math-social-activity-sel-video
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video describes and demonstrates how an upper-elementary teacher creates a cooperative learning environment in his classroom.
Highlights The video is rich in classroom footage. It offers a close-up look at working agreements. It also spotlights a fishbowl activity in which students “walk the talk” of their agreements. Many resources go along with the video. Users can check out a working agreement. They can explore the fishbowl protocol. They can also view sample student self-evaluations.
Raelin, J. A. (2006). Taking the charisma out: Teaching as facilitation. Organization Management Journal, 3(1), 4–12. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.northeastern.edu/poe/Raelin-OMJ.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article details how and why a professor changed his style from teacher-centered to student-centered.
Highlights The article offers a compelling discussion of the author’s choice to stop using a teaching style that relied on his personal charisma. His new teaching style focuses on student inquiry. The author explains why he made this shift and how his teaching looks different as a result.
Smithwick, M. (2007). Student-centered learning: The first steps are the hardest ones. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.education-world.com/a_curr/voice/voice117.shtml
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Math
Overview This article describes a math teacher’s switch to a student-centered teaching approach.
Highlights The article’s author talks about why and how she adopted a more student-centered approach to teaching math. She describes how the change affected her students’ learning.
Teachers TV. (2007). Problem-solving in primary maths—the session. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/teachers-tv/problem-solving-primary-maths-session
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video shows four upper-elementary students working collaboratively on a problem involving measurement, geometry, and algebra.
Highlights The video focuses on the student-to-student interactions. This approach offers the viewer an amazing glimpse of the collaborative process. The video also profiles the facilitation role of the teacher in collaborative learning.
WGBH Educational Foundation. (Producer). (2003). Teaching math. Session 2: Communication. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/courses/teachingmath/grades6_8/session_02/index.html
Type of Resource Online resource with video
Content Area Math
Overview This session is one of six in an online college-level course for middle school math teachers.
Highlights The session explores how students can learn to read, write, and talk about math. Its rich resources include videos, samples of student work, and questioning strategies for teachers.
Cramer, K. (2001, January). Using models to build an understanding of functions. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 6(5), 310–318. Available for free at: http://www.cehd.umn.edu/rationalnumberproject/01_1.html
Type of Resource Article
Content Area Math
Overview This article explains how using models in three problems helps students understand linear, quadratic, and exponential functions.
Highlights The article clearly describes all three models. For each, the author suggests questions to ask students. She presents the kinds of answers students will likely offer and provides samples of student work.
Haury, D. L., & Rillero, P. (1994). Perspectives of hands-on science teaching. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/content/cntareas/science/eric/eric-1.htm
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This online resource features 10 questions that teachers often ask about hands-on teaching and learning.
Highlights The resource gives three answers for each question. The result is a clear, balanced view of the hands-on approach.
Michigan Reach Out!. Quick and easy activities: Middle school activities. (2003). Retrieved [2009], from http://www.reachoutmichigan.org/funexperiments/quick/middlesch.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Science
Overview This online resource features links to a variety of hands-on science activities.
Highlights The resource has an A-Z list of more than 200 hands-on activities. Each focuses on a specific scientific concept.
Thirteen/WNET (Producer). (2004). Insights into Algebra 1: Teaching for learning. Workshop 8: Mathematical modeling. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=2103
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video shows how two teachers use models to build their students’ knowledge of key algebra concepts.
Highlights The video is one of eight workshops. All eight show students involved in hands-on learning that helps them grasp key math concepts. In this video, teachers share how and why models help them meet their learning objectives for their Algebra 1 students.
Twin Cities Public Television, Inc. (Producer). (2006). DragonflyTV—Technology and invention: Model rockets by Aren, Jessica, and Mary Lynn. Retrieved [2009], from PBSKids (Distributor), http://pbskids.org/dragonflytv/show/modelrockets.html
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video spotlights three young people who build and modify model rockets.
Highlights The video shows students talking about what they learn from model rockets. As they work on their rockets, they explore scientific concepts.
Contra Costa County Office of Education. Resources for middle school teachers: Curriculum—Lesson Plan: Multi-sensory writing. Retrieved [2009], from Teacher to Teacher: Advice, Tips, and Resources, http://www.cccoe.k12.ca.us/stsvcs/newteacher/middle/curr_mid_multisensory.html
Type of Resource Online resource (HTML and PDF)
Content Area English language arts
Overview This eighth grade multi-sensory writing lesson plan aims to help students “show” and not “tell” in their writing.
Highlights The lesson plan’s worksheet prompts students to use all five senses in their writing. In the plan’s writing assignment, students practice this kind of writing. The plan also includes a rubric and peer review worksheet.
Jerz, D. G. (2000). Show, don’t (just) tell. Retrieved [2009], from Dennis G. Jerz Weblog, http://jerz.setonhill.edu/writing/creative/showing.htm
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area English language arts
Overview This lively article details and models writing that shows vs. tells.
Highlights The article gives clear examples of writing that “tells” and writing that “shows.” The author—a professor at Seton Hill University—shares his thoughts about each example. He also suggests ways to write to engage readers.
Kentucky Educational Television (Producer). (2004). Write in the middle: A workshop for middle school teachers. Workshop 6. Responding to writing: Teacher to student. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=2077
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video shows how five teachers use student/teacher conferences to check students’ progress and help them hone their writing skills.
Highlights The video is one of eight workshops. All eight focus on writing instruction in middle school. This workshop covers such topics as: When should teachers and students have conferences? What does the rest of the class do? How can teachers make conferences effective? How can they make sure students feel a sense of “owning” their work? The video also features teacher interviews and discussions about conferencing.
Kentucky Educational Television (Producer). (2004). Write in the middle: A workshop for middle school teachers. Workshop 8. Teaching the power of revision. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=2079
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video shows how teachers can help students “buy into” the revision process.
Highlights The video is the last in a series on the best ways to build students’ writing skills. It shows the key role informal conferences can play in helping young writers with rewriting. It also includes comments from teachers and discussions about revision.
Medina, S. (2001). Using sensory details. Retrieved [2009], from http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/2385.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area English language arts
Overview This engaging lesson, designed for a Grade 9 class, focuses on sensory writing.
Highlights Students explore all five senses and write as they experience each. This lesson plan could be easily adapted for any grade.
Steighner, J. (2005, October 20). A seashell lesson: Writing for detail and the scientific process. Education World. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.education-world.com/a_tsl/archives/05-1/lesson030.shtml
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Science
Overview This lesson plan offers a way to help students weave details into their scientific writing.
Highlights The lesson plan clearly explains how students can use seashells to practice writing with detail. The author briefly explains her assessment process as well.
Black P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. Phi Delta Kappan, 80(2), 139–148. Retrieved [2014], from http://www.spd.dcu.ie/site/teaching_today/documents/Raisingstandardsthroughclassroomassessment.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article has a useful review of research on the role and value of formative assessment.
Highlights The article asserts that formative assessment is at “the heart of effective teaching.” From their review of the research, the authors found that this kind of assessment helps raise student performance. They offer four steps schools can take to improve their use of formative assessment.
Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2007). Checking for understanding: Formative assessment techniques for your classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Available for purchase at http://www.ascd.org/Publications/Books/Overview/Checking-for-Understanding.aspx
Type of Resource Book
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This book provides a variety of ways to check for students’ understanding.
Highlights The book suggests that most of the methods teachers use to gauge students’ knowledge do not work well. Using clear examples and realistic vignettes, the authors propose new ways to approach assessment.
Garrison, C., & Ehringhaus, M. Formative and summative assessments in the classroom. Retrieved [2014], from http://standardslearning.pbworks.com/f/Formative+and+Summative+Assessments+in+the+Classroom.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article defines and describes formative and summative ways to measure student learning.
Highlights The article argues that middle school teachers need to use both types of assessment in their work with students. The authors note that when teachers use both forms, they gain a full understanding of each student’s growth and needs. They suggest several ways to formatively assess students’ knowledge.
Teachers TV. (2008). Assessment for learning in KS3/4 science—Anita and biology. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/teachers-tv/assessment-learning-ks34-science-anita-and-biology
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video shows why and how a teacher uses a formative assessment technique.
Highlights The video spotlights biology teacher Anita Kapila. In the video, she talks about how she assesses her students using the school's model, The Level Ladder. This approach tells children what level they're at and guides them to improve their grades and make progress. The result: more students are eager to learn more about biology.
Teachers TV. (2006). Secondary assessment—formative assessment. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/secondary-assessment-formative-assessment
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This video offers a clear review of the key features of formative assessment.
Highlights The video takes a look at how formative assessment can help raise academic standards. It covers peer- and self-assessment and feedback. It also stresses the value of open questioning and effective marking. Classroom footage and experts bring the ideas to life.
Andrade, H. (2007/08). Self-assessment through rubrics. Educational Leadership, 65(4), 60–63. Retrieved [2009], from http://daretodifferentiate.wikispaces.com/file/view/Self-Assessment Through Rubrics - Andrade - December 2007_January 2008.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article outlines how rubrics can help students assess their learning in all topics.
Highlights The article makes a strong case for this approach. The author cites current research and defines key terms. She also pinpoints the ingredients of effective self-assessment. Topics include: defining rubrics, setting clear expectations, and using and revising tools.
Andrade, H., Buff, C., Terry, J., Erano, M., & Paolino, S. (2009, March). Assessment-driven improvements in middle school students’ writing. Middle School Journal, 40(4), 4–12. Full text available for download at http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ833638
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area English language arts
Overview This article describes how one middle school’s use of self- and peer-assessments helped improve its students’ writing.
Highlights The article’s authors talk about how the school helped students understand self- and peer-assessment. They discuss how frequent feedback from teachers and peers helps students improve their writing. They also share how teachers used what they learned about their students’ strengths and challenges to plan their curriculum and instruction.
Education Development Center, Inc. (n.d.). Evidence of understanding: An introduction to assessments in K–12 science curriculum. Middle school assessments: Self-assessments. Retrieved [2009], from http://cse.edc.org/products/assessment/middleschool/self.asp
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Science
Overview This resource talks about how to use self-assessment and how it benefits students.
Highlights The resource makes a strong case for why to use this approach to support students’ learning. It has many clear, vivid examples of how teachers weave self-assessment into their work with students.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (Producer). (1997). Assessment in math and science: What’s the point? Workshop 2. What’d I get? Scoring tools. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1034
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math and science
Overview This video shows teachers and students partnering to design assessment tools that work.
Highlights The video is one of eight that share ways to hone K–12 math and science assessment. The goal: To help teachers use assessments to improve teaching and learning. In this video, students and teachers design tools to measure student work.
Teachers TV. (2006). Secondary assessment—formative assessment. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/secondary-assessment-formative-assessment
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This video offers a clear review of the key features of formative assessment.
Highlights The video takes a look at how formative assessment can help raise academic standards. It covers peer- and self-assessment and feedback. It also stresses the value of open questioning and effective marking. Classroom footage and experts bring the ideas to life.
Yoshida, C. (1997). Creating a culture of student reflection: Self-assessment yields positive results. Edutopia. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.edutopia.org/creating-culture-student-reflection
Type of Resource Article
Content Area Science
Overview This article’s close-up view of one school’s peer and self-assessment practices offers tips for other schools.
Highlights The article’s author is a teacher at a school in San Diego. He shares how his school goes about creating a culture of self-assessment and reflection. He notes that the school’s efforts are bearing fruit. Students are more proficient at critiquing and taking ownership of their own work. They also appear to be learning more as they revise their work and move toward mastery.
Andrade, H., Buff, C., Terry, J., Erano, M., & Paolino, S. (2009, March). Assessment-driven improvements in middle school students’ writing. Middle School Journal, 40(4), 4–12. Full text available for download at http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ833638
Type of Resource Article
Content Area English language arts
Overview This article describes how one middle school’s use of self- and peer-assessments helped improve its students’ writing.
Highlights The article’s authors talk about how the school helped students understand self- and peer-assessment. They discuss how frequent feedback from teachers and peers helps students improve their writing. They also share how teachers used what they learned about their students’ strengths and challenges to plan their curriculum and instruction.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (Producer). (1997). Assessment in math and science: What’s the point? Workshop 3. Is this going to count?: Embedded assessment. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/resources/series93.html?pop=yes&pid=1035
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video shows how weaving assessment into teaching can boost learning outcomes.
Highlights The video is one of eight that share ways to hone K–12 math and science assessment. The goal: To help teachers use assessments to improve teaching and learning. In this video, a teacher shows how she uses assessment to help her students know what they know and don’t know in order to plan how they can progress.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (Producer). (1997). Assessment in math and science: What’s the point? Workshop 7. That would never work here, either! Seeing assessment reform in action, part II. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/resources/series93.html?pop=yes&pid=1039
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science and math
Overview This video shows how students improve their performance when they assess their work and their peers’ work.
Highlights The video is one of eight that share ways to hone K–12 math and science assessment. The goal: To help teachers use assessments to improve teaching and learning. In this video, two teachers engage their students in assessing their work and that of their peers. Footage shows how these built-in forms of assessment help students achieve.
Ruckdeschel, S. (2008). Peer coaching—Transition in the middle. In Transition: Journal of the New York State Middle School Association, XXVI(1). Retrieved [2014], from http://www.nysmsa.org/wp-content/uploads/files/itv26n1.pdf
Type of Resource Article
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article describes peer coaching, a method writers use to edit their work.
Highlights The article’s author explores how students peer coach to hone their writing. In the process, they set writing goals, give and receive feedback, and listen actively. This three-step process helps them make decisions that result in polished writing products. It also fosters the habit of revision, one of the keys to strong writing.
Swartzlander, D. (2007). Effects of self-assessment on math homework. Retrieved [2009], from http://scimath.unl.edu/MIM/files/research/SwartzlanderD.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Math
Overview This study explores how students change and grow when they assess their math homework.
Highlights The study concludes that self-assessment is a crucial component of student learning. It also found that students are not skilled with self-assessment. At the beginning of the year, teachers can model what good work looks like. This will help students know how to evaluate their own and their peers’ work.
Andrade, H., Buff, C., Terry, J., Erano, M., & Paolino, S. (2009, March). Assessment-driven improvements in middle school students’ writing. Middle School Journal, 40(4), 4–12. Full text available for download at http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ833638
Type of Resource Article
Content Area English language arts
Overview This article describes how one middle school’s use of self- and peer-assessments helped improve its students’ writing.
Highlights The article’s authors talk about how the school helped students understand self- and peer-assessment. They discuss how frequent feedback from teachers and peers helps students improve their writing. They also share how teachers used what they learned about their students’ strengths and challenges to plan their curriculum and instruction.
Kentucky Educational Television (Producer). (2004). Write in the middle: A workshop for middle school teachers. Workshop 7. Responding to writing: Peer to peer. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=2078
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video shows how working with peers can help build students’ writing skills.
Highlights The video is one of eight workshops, all focused on teaching writing in middle school. This video explores how to use peer conferencing and shows the work of three middle school teachers who use this strategy. It features interviews with teachers, as well as comments from experts on the value of peer response. (Search http://www.learner.org/workshops/middlewriting/, the website that hosts this series, for more resources on peer conferencing.)
Ruckdeschel, S. (2008). Peer coaching—Transition in the middle. In Transition: Journal of the New York State Middle School Association, XXVI(1). Retrieved [2014], from http://www.nysmsa.org/wp-content/uploads/files/itv26n1.pdf
Type of Resource Article
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article describes peer coaching, a method writers use to edit their work.
Highlights The article’s author explores how students peer coach to hone their writing. In the process, they set writing goals, give and receive feedback, and listen actively. This three-step process helps them make decisions that result in polished writing products. It also fosters the habit of revision, one of the keys to strong writing.
Saddler, B., & Andrade, H. (2004, October). The writing rubric. Educational Leadership, 62(2), 48–52. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/oct04/vol62/num02/The_Writing_Rubric.aspx
Type of Resource Article
Content Area English language arts
Overview This article asserts that rubrics can help students become stronger, more confident writers.
Highlights The article’s authors make a strong case for using rubrics. They argue that rubrics can benefit struggling writers by helping them practice their writing skills. To make their points, they cite research and provide concrete examples.
Teachers TV. (2006). Modern foreign languages—Peer assessment. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/teachers-tv/ks34-modern-foreign-languages-peer-assessment
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This video spotlights the best ways to develop and use peer assessment in the classroom.
Highlights The video features three UK classrooms that use peer assessment to assess students’ written and oral assignments. Teachers and students discuss the key skills that are part of this approach. These skills include giving feedback and applying assessment criteria.
Teachers TV. (2006). Secondary assessment—formative assessment. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/secondary-assessment-formative-assessment
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This video offers a clear review of the key features of formative assessment.
Highlights The video takes a look at how formative assessment can help students reach academic standards. It covers peer- and self-assessment, including providing feedback. It also stresses effective questioning and productive written comments on student work. Classroom footage and experts bring the ideas to life.
Andrade, H. (2007/08). Self-assessment through rubrics. Educational Leadership, 65(4), 60–63. Retrieved [2009], from http://daretodifferentiate.wikispaces.com/file/view/Self-Assessment Through Rubrics - Andrade - December 2007_January 2008.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article outlines how rubrics can help students assess their learning in all topics.
Highlights The article makes a strong case for rubrics. The author cites current research and defines key terms. She also describes effective self-assessment. Topics include: rubrics, setting clear expectations, and using and revising tools.
Exemplars. (2004). Student rubrics. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.exemplars.com/resources/rubrics/student.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Math and science
Overview This online resource provides samples of math and science rubrics.
Highlights The resource offers effective rubrics such as “Jigsaw” and “Seed.” All rubrics are available as printer-friendly pages, making it easy for teachers to use them in the classroom.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (Producer). (1997). Assessment in math and science: What’s the point? Workshop 2. What’d I get? Scoring tools. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1034
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math and science
Overview This video shows teachers and students partnering to design assessment tools that work.
Highlights The video is one of eight that share ways to hone K–12 math and science assessment. The goal: To help teachers use assessments to improve teaching and learning. In this video, students and teachers design tools to measure student work.
Shaffner, M. (2009). Teaching module: Assessment. How do rubrics help? Edutopia. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.edutopia.org/teaching-module-assessment-rubrics
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This online resource details how rubrics can help students and teachers share an understanding of how teachers evaluate work.
Highlights The resource offers an overview of why and how teachers should use rubrics. It talks about types of rubrics, links to sample rubrics, and offers guidance in using rubrics.
Teachers TV. (2008). Assessment for learning in KS3/4 science—Anita and biology. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/teachers-tv/assessment-learning-ks34-science-anita-and-biology
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Science
Overview This video shows why and how a teacher uses a formative assessment technique.
Highlights The video spotlights biology teacher Anita Kapila. In the video, she talks about how she assesses her students using the school's model, The Level Ladder. This approach tells children what level they're at and guides them to improve their grades and make progress. The result: more students are eager to learn more about biology.
Vandervelde, J. (2007–2009). Rubrics for assessment. Retrieved [2009], from University of Wisconsin – Stout, http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/rubrics.shtml
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This online resource offers and links to a wealth of information about rubrics.
Highlights The resource provides sample math, art, writing, and science rubrics. It also offers rubrics to assess newer forms of student work such as podcasts, webpages, and multimedia projects. Teachers can use the sample templates to create their own rubrics.
WGBH Boston (Producer). (1997). Mathematics assessment: A video library, K–12. Program 11. Beyond testing. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1070
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video compares older models of assessment to newer methods, such as rubrics.
Highlights This video is part of an 11-program online library. All 11 videos explore the Assessment Standards and Purposes of Assessment of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. In this video, a group that includes parents, teachers, and school leaders take part in a lively discussion. They talk about several forms of assessment. They also discuss the link between instruction and assessment.
The Access Center. (n.d.). Professional development modules: Differentation module. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.k8accesscenter.org/training_resources/differentiationmodule.asp
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This online course describes differentiation and suggests ways to use this strategy.
Highlights The course features a PowerPoint slide show. It also has a facilitator’s guide and several handouts. Using these materials, a school- or district-level facilitator can lead staff through the module.
Sands, D. I., & Barker, H. B. (2004). Organized chaos: Modeling differentiated instruction for preservice teachers. Teaching & Learning, 19(1), 26–49. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/ehd/journal/Fall%202004/sands.pdf
Type of Resource PDF
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article describes using a differentiated lesson plan to teach pre-service teachers about differentiation.
Highlights The article details how teachers can plan and teach lessons that they tailor to meet the needs of their students. It stresses that teachers must understand what their students know before and after a lesson. It suggests ways to gather this information and shows how to adapt one lesson for learners with varying degrees of background knowledge.
School Improvement Network. (2008). Differentiating instruction to meet the needs of all students: Classroom example. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oS45ZkIh_rA
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video shows footage of differentiation in action in a high school classroom
Highlights The video spotlights a lesson on “Julius Caesar.” The teacher models how she helps her students focus on the lesson. As she does so, the video points out specific techniques the teacher is using. The piece includes definitions of differentiation, related theories that support this approach, and expert commentary.
Teachers TV. (2006). Managing learning—secondary—differentiation. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/teachers-tv/managing-learning-secondary-differentiation
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This video shows how two teachers differentiate instruction to meet the needs of their students.
Highlights The video spotlights two ways to tailor instruction. One teacher alters tasks based on students’ learning abilities. The other teacher gives students different levels of support. The video explores the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. It also features comments from an expert.
Theroux, P. (2004). Differentiating instruction. Enhance Learning with Technology. Retrieved [2009], from http://members.shaw.ca/priscillatheroux/differentiating.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This online resource gives teachers a useful overview of differentiation.
Highlights The resource describes four ways to differentiate instruction. It also offers links to more resources.
Cano, J., Henry, L., Lange, V., Lawson, L., Pennil, E., Stager, J., & Van Der Stuyf, R. (2002). Scaffolding website. City College of New York. Retrieved [2009], http://condor.admin.ccny.cuny.edu/~group4/
Type of Resource Online resource with video
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This webpage, created by students for a college course, features research papers, lesson plans, and a short video.
Highlights The webpage’s research papers discuss the scaffolding strategy and offer several approaches. The lesson plans describe what teachers can do to scaffold a lesson.
Coffey, H. (2009). Scaffolding. LEARN NC: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/5074
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This article talks about the nature and use of scaffolding.
Highlights The article is one of a series on instruction. The author describes the key elements of scaffolding. She also details what the strategy looks like in the classroom. She asserts that it can help students learn new topics and suggests that it can benefit students with special learning needs.
Detroit Public Television & Mort Crim Communications (Producer). (2003). The Learning classroom: Theory into practice. Session 8. Watch it, do it, know it: Cognitive apprenticeship. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1865
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video shows how teachers can use scaffolding to support students’ learning.
Highlights The video is part of a 13-program course. All 13 explore K–12 learning theory. This video spotlights how to use cognitive apprenticeships. It looks at one teacher modeling how to take part in a literature discussion—including what to do if students disagree. She coaches and guides students, and slowly, they take on a greater role in leading their own learning.
Ruckdeschel, S. (2002–2009). Scaffolding comprehension strategies using graphic organizers. ReadWriteThink. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/scaffolding-comprehension-strategies-using-95.html
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area English language arts
Overview This lesson plan shares a way to help students master a strategy to improve their reading comprehension.
Highlights The lesson plan focuses on the collaborative strategic reading (CSR) technique. Students use graphic organizers to practice the technique. The lesson plan describes how this process helps scaffold their learning. (This lesson is on a website that the National Council of Teachers of English supports.)
Teachers TV. (2007). From good to outstanding—Vicky Edwards. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/teachers-tv/good-outstanding-vicky-edwards
Type of Resource Video
Content Area English language arts
Overview This video spotlights a teacher who builds her skills to prepare for a visit from an evaluator.
Highlights The video shows the teacher reflecting on her strengths and weaknesses. She seeks advice from a coach who trains her to use scaffolding strategies. As she tries to use the new strategies—open-ended questions, engaging props—she sees how they will help her students gain a deeper understanding of the content.
Center for Applied Special Technology, National Center on Universal Design for Learning. (2009). UDL guidelines - Version 1.0: Principle I. Provide multiple means of representation. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/udlguidelines/principle1
Type of Resource Online resource
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This website talks about how teachers can tailor their presentation of content to best fit students’ needs.
Highlights The website notes that not all students have the same needs and learning styles. It describes three methods that teachers can use to share content with students and provides examples for each method.
Teachers TV. (2006). Managing learning—secondary—differentiation. Retrieved [2009], from http://www.teachfind.com/teachers-tv/managing-learning-secondary-differentiation
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Interdisciplinary
Overview This video shows how two teachers differentiate instruction to meet the needs of their students.
Highlights The video spotlights two ways to tailor instruction. One teacher alters tasks based on students’ learning abilities. The other teacher gives students different levels of support. The video explores the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. It also features comments from an expert.
WGBH Boston (Producer). (1997). Teaching math: A video library, 5–8. Program 4: Building viewpoints. Retrieved [2009], from Annenberg Media (Distributor), http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=919
Type of Resource Video
Content Area Math
Overview This video shows seventh grade students creating and drawing their own 3-D objects.
Highlights The video captures students as they build 3-D objects from 2-D plans. Then, it shows students making new 2-D representations of the objects they built. Video footage illustrates how students learn and benefit from multiple mathematic representations.

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